COMMON PEOPLE #16

JESSICA BLUME, BYRON BAY NSW

A self confessed routine-less ‘80’s teenage boy’ Jume’s Jess Blume is as in touch with her lush surrounds of Byron Bay as she is her small textile manufacturing team of 10. A woman dictated by the tides, passionate about ethically sourced fabrics and using sustainable processes. We wear Jess’s clothes and feel the essence of her pride in each garment.

 

WORDS BY JESSICA BLUME

COMMON PEOPLE #16

JESSICA BLUME, BYRON BAY NSW

A self confessed routine-less ‘80’s teenage boy’ Jume’s Jess Blume is as in touch with her lush surrounds of Byron Bay as she is her small textile manufacturing team of 10. A woman dictated by the tides, passionate about ethically sourced fabrics and using sustainable processes. We wear Jess’s clothes and feel the essence of her pride in each garment.

WORDS BY JESSICA BLUME

 

 

TELL US ABOUT WHAT YOU DO JESS?
 

I run a little clothing label called Jume, focusing on small batches of ethically produced garments using organic fabrics and natural dye processes. I also have a ceramics and weaving practice that I hope to focus more on over the next year or so and am working on a collaborative collection of garments using hand woven Khadi and herb dyed cloth that my friend, the artist Nell Pearson and I sourced from India last year.

 

DO YOU HAVE A CREATIVE PROCESS WHEN DESIGNING FOR JUME?
 

I think for the label the creative process is ongoing, I think about it all the time and think about what garments I wish I had and then find a way to produce that as ethically as possible.

Because my background is in textiles rather than fashion I usually design the same way I make tapestries, I start with a palate I am obsessed with then go hunting for fabrics that melt my heart and then think of a simple and timeless way to best honour that cloth. I am in love with hemp, nettle and hand woven organic cottons and I collect incredible fabrics while I travel then design around them. Last year in Sri Lanka I became obsessed with the palate and weave of the men's Sari’s there and worked on a batch of simple one-off pieces using them and now my next collection will be focused around the breathtaking cloth I bought in India. It's a fun process that includes travelling and looking into the different textile histories of the world more so than looking to tap in to the latest trends and i much prefer this way of designing.

 

HOW DO YOU SOURCE YOUR FABRICS AND ENSURE ETHICAL PRODUCTION OF YOUR WARES?
 

In regards to sourcing and manufacturing I think it's important to go to the source in person. So many of the problems regarding sustainability occur when the supply chain is long and complicated where you end up with blind spots in production.

I spend a few months a year with my manufacturing studio in Indonesia which is run by my good friend and her grandmother their family and make sure I am paying well over average for manufacturing. Hanging out there with the tiny family team (only about 10 of them!) is fun and relaxed and if there was ever pressure or strain I would know as my friend puts her families needs, including religious obligations and mine on the same level always and I respect that immensely, we are all equals with different roles, benefitting from any success of the label.

In regards to the fabrics, I studied sustainable textiles at RMIT and have quite a clear idea of which fabrics are the most sustainable and ethical and always seek them out. Certified KHADI is an amazing ethical fabric I seek out too as it is sustainable but also is really amazing for keeping rural jobs in the community.

I am also setting up a new manufacturer in India for my larger orders which focuses exclusively on herb dying organic cloth which is amazing and I have spent time there too and fell in love with the light and friendly studio there and have seen first hand their amazing work they are doing for India's sustainable textile industry.

 

TELL US ABOUT WHAT YOU DO JESS?
 

I run a little clothing label called Jume, focusing on small batches of ethically produced garments using organic fabrics and natural dye processes. I also have a ceramics and weaving practice that I hope to focus more on over the next year or so and am working on a collaborative collection of garments using hand woven Khadi and herb dyed cloth that my friend, the artist Nell Pearson and I sourced from India last year.

 

DO YOU HAVE A CREATIVE PROCESS WHEN DESIGNING FOR JUME?
 

I think for the label the creative process is ongoing, I think about it all the time and think about what garments I wish I had and then find a way to produce that as ethically as possible.

Because my background is in textiles rather than fashion I usually design the same way I make tapestries, I start with a palate I am obsessed with then go hunting for fabrics that melt my heart and then think of a simple and timeless way to best honour that cloth. I am in love with hemp, nettle and hand woven organic cottons and I collect incredible fabrics while I travel then design around them. Last year in Sri Lanka I became obsessed with the palate and weave of the men's Sari’s there and worked on a batch of simple one-off pieces using them and now my next collection will be focused around the breathtaking cloth I bought in India. It's a fun process that includes travelling and looking into the different textile histories of the world more so than looking to tap in to the latest trends and i much prefer this way of designing.

 

HOW DO YOU SOURCE YOUR FABRICS AND ENSURE ETHICAL PRODUCTION OF YOUR WARES?
 

In regards to sourcing and manufacturing I think it's important to go to the source in person. So many of the problems regarding sustainability occur when the supply chain is long and complicated where you end up with blind spots in production.

I spend a few months a year with my manufacturing studio in Indonesia which is run by my good friend and her grandmother their family and make sure I am paying well over average for manufacturing. Hanging out there with the tiny family team (only about 10 of them!) is fun and relaxed and if there was ever pressure or strain I would know as my friend puts her families needs, including religious obligations and mine on the same level always and I respect that immensely, we are all equals with different roles, benefitting from any success of the label.

In regards to the fabrics, I studied sustainable textiles at RMIT and have quite a clear idea of which fabrics are the most sustainable and ethical and always seek them out. Certified KHADI is an amazing ethical fabric I seek out too as it is sustainable but also is really amazing for keeping rural jobs in the community.

I am also setting up a new manufacturer in India for my larger orders which focuses exclusively on herb dying organic cloth which is amazing and I have spent time there too and fell in love with the light and friendly studio there and have seen first hand their amazing work they are doing for India's sustainable textile industry.

"Because my background is in textiles rather than fashion I usually design the same way I make tapestries, I start with a palate I am obsessed with then go hunting for fabrics that melt my heart and then think of a simple and timeless way to best honour that cloth. I am in love with hemp, nettle and hand woven organic cottons and I collect incredible fabrics while I travel then design around them."

"Because my background is in textiles rather than fashion I usually design the same way I make tapestries, I start with a palate I am obsessed with then go hunting for fabrics that melt my heart and then think of a simple and timeless way to best honour that cloth. I am in love with hemp, nettle and hand woven organic cottons and I collect incredible fabrics while I travel then design around them."

 

WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR DESIGNS AND BRAND?
 

Making something that I am proud of. This means something that is sustainable environmentally and made in a way where I feel happy and everyone involved in my supply chain feels happy too. I want us all to be better off for it existing. I want the clothes to make people feel happy and good too, like they are excited to leave the house because they feel beautiful, fresh and cool *laughs*.

 

BEING BASED IN SUNNY BYRON BAY HAS THIS BEEN PART OF YOUR INSPIRATION?
 

Yeah for sure, the first collection was designed when I was living on the great ocean road in a big white wooden beach house that looked like a boat and the garments really reflect that, lots of white linen and stripes. Now that I am here surfing way more and kicking around dressed like a teenage boy from the 80's I am making much more playful stuff, brighter colours that unintentionally reflect the tropical wildlife up here.

 

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT LIVING WHERE YOU LIVE?
 

I love all the space and windows and the gardens with fruit trees all the way around. I love the cows and horses and big green tree frogs in our yard a lot too! I love that it's just outside Mullumbimby which has great places for eating out but still feels to me like the old Byron from my childhood. I love the bay with all my heart, I grew up here and the tropics are in my heart. Getting to surf everyday in turquoise water with sea turtles and dolphins and rays with an amazing bunch of friends just brings me so so much simple grounding joy.

 

DO YOU HAVE ANY DAILY RITUALS?
 

No not really apart from having a coffee the second I wake up! I'm all over the place travelling a lot for work, sleeping in my van and with friends so my life is too chaotic for routine haha. The other thing is so much of my day is dictated by the tides, winds and swell and deadlines! If there is not work that need to be prioritised, then the sea comes first and the work time moulds around that but everyday I usually do Jume work, get some nature and exercise and socialise for at least one meal, without these things I would get a bit anxious.

 

WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR DESIGNS AND BRAND?
 

Making something that I am proud of. This means something that is sustainable environmentally and made in a way where I feel happy and everyone involved in my supply chain feels happy too. I want us all to be better off for it existing. I want the clothes to make people feel happy and good too, like they are excited to leave the house because they feel beautiful, fresh and cool *laughs*.

 

BEING BASED IN SUNNY BYRON BAY HAS THIS BEEN PART OF YOUR INSPIRATION?
 

Yeah for sure, the first collection was designed when I was living on the great ocean road in a big white wooden beach house that looked like a boat and the garments really reflect that, lots of white linen and stripes. Now that I am here surfing way more and kicking around dressed like a teenage boy from the 80's I am making much more playful stuff, brighter colours that unintentionally reflect the tropical wildlife up here.

 

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT LIVING WHERE YOU LIVE?
 

I love all the space and windows and the gardens with fruit trees all the way around. I love the cows and horses and big green tree frogs in our yard a lot too! I love that it's just outside Mullumbimby which has great places for eating out but still feels to me like the old Byron from my childhood. I love the bay with all my heart, I grew up here and the tropics are in my heart. Getting to surf everyday in turquoise water with sea turtles and dolphins and rays with an amazing bunch of friends just brings me so so much simple grounding joy.

 

DO YOU HAVE ANY DAILY RITUALS?
 

No not really apart from having a coffee the second I wake up! I'm all over the place travelling a lot for work, sleeping in my van and with friends so my life is too chaotic for routine haha. The other thing is so much of my day is dictated by the tides, winds and swell and deadlines! If there is not work that need to be prioritised, then the sea comes first and the work time moulds around that but everyday I usually do Jume work, get some nature and exercise and socialise for at least one meal, without these things I would get a bit anxious.

"Making something that I am proud of. This means something that is sustainable environmentally and made in a way where I feel happy and everyone involved in my supply chain feels happy too. I want us all to be better off for it existing. I want the clothes to make people feel happy and good too, like they are excited to leave the house because they feel beautiful, fresh and cool *laughs*."

"Making something that I am proud of. This means something that is sustainable environmentally and made in a way where I feel happy and everyone involved in my supply chain feels happy too. I want us all to be better off for it existing. I want the clothes to make people feel happy and good too, like they are excited to leave the house because they feel beautiful, fresh and cool *laughs*."

 

WHAT'S NEXT FOR YOU AND JUME?

I have been working since last year on a collection with one of my best friends, Nell Pearson. She is an incredible artist and we have so much fun planning shoots, and finding fabrics we love and making weird things and so will be doing more of that this year for sure. This year me and Nelly are also starting to manufacture with this amazing team in India that are plant dye masters and are sustainable production heroes of ours! Every detail is considered and the fabrics in India are so incredible to work with so that is really exciting. Personally I think I will stay in Byron Bay this year and then the textile tour of the world will continue starting in Mexico, a place very dear to my heart.

Learn more about Jessica here. 

 

WHAT'S NEXT FOR YOU AND JUME?

I have been working since last year on a collection with one of my best friends, Nell Pearson. She is an incredible artist and we have so much fun planning shoots, and finding fabrics we love and making weird things and so will be doing more of that this year for sure. This year me and Nelly are also starting to manufacture with this amazing team in India that are plant dye masters and are sustainable production heroes of ours! Every detail is considered and the fabrics in India are so incredible to work with so that is really exciting. Personally I think I will stay in Byron Bay this year and then the textile tour of the world will continue starting in Mexico, a place very dear to my heart.

Learn more about Jessica here. 

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A savour to all pricks out there, meet the boy-next-door Callum Crinis who collects, revives and trades in cacti. Callum runs a business called Cactus Talk, named by his friends because Callum just loves to talk about cacti. From his backyard greenhouse Callum grows an extensive collection with over 100 different varieties and is not afraid to share a few tips and tricks to keep your cacti happy and healthy.

PREVIOUS ENTRY

COMMON PEOPLE #15

CALLUM CRINIS, WOLLONGONG NSW

A savour to all pricks out there, meet the boy-next-door Callum Crinis who collects, revives and trades in cacti. Callum runs a business called Cactus Talk, named by his friends because Callum just loves to talk about cacti. From his backyard greenhouse Callum grows an extensive collection with over 100 different varieties and is not afraid to share a few tips and tricks to keep your cacti happy and healthy.